<div dir="ltr"><div>Hari, I understand your discussion of categorical independent variable with several discrete levels (conditions), but how would you extend this logic to a continuous correlation design, where each trial has its own individual value of the independent variable? For simplicity, let&#39;s assume that we&#39;re trying to model the effect of trial order on neural adaption, and you want to use the actual trial number (not just bin your trials into &quot;early&quot; and &quot;late&quot;).<br>

<br></div>Tal<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Feb 20, 2014 at 10:57 AM, Hari Bharadwaj <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:hari@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu" target="_blank">hari@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Hi Denis et al.,<br>
    It appears to me that there are two separate issues being confused<br>
here and perhaps there will be some clarity if we talk through it:<br>
<br>
(A) Whether to compute &quot;betas&quot; in sensor-space or source-space:<br>
    This is not really a difficult question within the MNE or other linear<br>
inverse solution framework. Because, for a given inverse operator<br>
(let&#39;s call it M), computing betas in sensor or source space should<br>
lead to identical results unless the statistical model being fitted to<br>
compute the betas is somehow non-linear.<br>
<br>
(B) Choice of the noise model used to compute the operator M:<br>
    This issue is more subtle and important and does not depend on the<br>
sequence in which you do things in (A). One has to consider this<br>
question regardless of whether he/she is doing stats in sensor-space<br>
or source space. By projecting things to source-space first, one<br>
doesn&#39;t become immune to an inappropriate choice of the noise model.<br>
   If the noise covariance employed corresponds to that of single-trials<br>
(eg., if you choose to scale it with nave = 1 because you are<br>
projecting single trial data), the map would be unnecessarily smooth<br>
even if later you combine 100s of trials to show you final &quot;map&quot; of<br>
interest. The prior (the minimum norm part) will be given much more<br>
weight and the data fit will be given lot less weight than is<br>
appropriate. Thus, one should employ a noise-covariance scaling *with<br>
the foresight* of what analysis is planned, especially in the context<br>
of regressions.<br>
   I think there is one special case in the context of regressions/ANOVA<br>
that occurs frequently and is easy to handle. This is the case where<br>
&quot;betas&quot; are computed with the weights that are normalized (these<br>
weights are sometimes called &quot;contrasts&quot; in stats parlance)..<br>
 That is if: beta = sum_over_i{w_i * x_i} where x_i is the mean from the<br>
i^th group of trials, and if sum_over_i { w_i**2} == 1, and the x_i&#39;s<br>
come from the same number of trials, then the beta values have the same<br>
noise variance as the x_i&#39;s. To take the simplest example of this case,<br>
if x_1 and x_2 are evoked responses for conditions 1 and 2 (each with<br>
nave = 100 trials), then if you compute your beta values as the<br>
difference divided by sqrt(2), then scaling the noise-covariance by nave<br>
= 100 is appropriate when computing M. In practice, if all the conditions<br>
that go into the stats have the same number of trials, and if the stats<br>
employs orthonormal contrasts, then the default MNE scaling of nave =<br>
#trials works well..<br>
<br>
Hope this helps..<br>
<br>
Hari<br>
<div><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
<br>
On Thu, February 20, 2014 5:48 am, Denis-Alexander Engemann wrote:<br>
&gt; Hi everyone,<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; this is really an interesting and productive discussion which I enjoy<br>
&gt; following very much. And it&#39;s especially timely and relevant, since we<br>
&gt; plan to support high-level functions for single trial regression in<br>
&gt; MNE-Python in the future. Tal Linzen has recently started drafting<br>
&gt; examples and first functions, cf.<br>
&gt; <a href="https://github.com/mne-tools/mne-python/pull/1034" target="_blank">https://github.com/mne-tools/mne-python/pull/1034</a>.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Since the there were a few open questions for Teon&#39;s use case we<br>
&gt; decided to postpone adding direct support for projecting beta-maps.<br>
&gt; However, if we could use the collective knowledge and experience<br>
&gt; distributed over this mailing list, it might be possible to clarify<br>
&gt; those questions and add support this use case directly in MNE-Python<br>
&gt; rather soon.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; My main concern with the beta-map projection approach is that the<br>
&gt; noise structure (and the units) as reflected in the noise covariance<br>
&gt; computed on raw M/EEG signals don&#39;t necessarily match with the noise<br>
&gt; structure present in the beta maps. This would mean a model mismatch.<br>
&gt; To tackle this issues different options might be possible, such as<br>
&gt; using an identity matrix as noise covariance or estimating the noise<br>
&gt; covariance on whitened single trials.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Input on both the work-in-progress on MNE-Python and the conceptual<br>
&gt; issues is highly appreciated.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Cheers,<br>
&gt; Denis<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; On Thu, Feb 20, 2014 at 7:57 AM, Alexandre Gramfort<br>
&gt; &lt;<a href="mailto:alexandre.gramfort@telecom-paristech.fr">alexandre.gramfort@telecom-paristech.fr</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt; hi Don,<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; thanks a lot for sharing these insights.<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; Although I get the idea of what you suggest, I am not sure<br>
&gt;&gt; I would be able to perfectly replicate this analysis.<br>
&gt;&gt; Do you happen to have a script you could share?<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; Also can you give the full ref from which the figure is extracted?<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; thanks again<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; Best,<br>
&gt;&gt; Alex<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; On Wed, Feb 19, 2014 at 8:30 PM, Krieger, Donald N. &lt;<a href="mailto:kriegerd@upmc.edu">kriegerd@upmc.edu</a>&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Dear Teon,<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; You have raised several interesting questions on which I would like to<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; expand.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Hari responded to several technical issues, viz. (1) constraints on<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; what you<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; do to retain the validity of your subsequent projection into source<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; space<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; and (2) weighting the regression to compensate for unequal numbers of<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; trials<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; for different levels of the independent variable.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Here are some points about the meaning of what you are doing and about<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; the<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; technical issues.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; (1)    If the independent variable is scaled rather than a 0/1 dummy,<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; i.e.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; has multiple numeric levels, then your regression is asking a specific<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; quantitative question about the amplitude of the magnetic field/source,<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; i.e.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; is the amplitude a linear function of the independent variable?  If for<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; example the variable takes values n and 2n, you are asking: &quot;Is the<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; amplitude for the &quot;2n&quot; trials double what it is for the &quot;n&quot; trials?<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; (2)    I think it&#39;s reasonable to assume that many of the sources<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; contributing to the magnetic field have nothing to do with the task.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Although you are working with single trial data, your regression across<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; the<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; trials is collapsing the data in a generalized version of averaging.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; That<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; helps attenuate the contributions to the field of unrelated sources.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; But if<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; (a) there was a way up front to define regions of interest within the<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; brain<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; which you think are involved in the task, and (b) if the linear<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; hypothesis<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; you are testing is true, you should do better by doing the projection<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; first<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; and then doing the regression on the vertices within one ROI at a time.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;   In<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; that way you take advantage of the signal space separation capabilities<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; of<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; your projection operation to isolate the sources you think are<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; involved.  If<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; you want to get formal statistics from your regression, you must find a<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; way<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; to adjust the degrees of freedom since presumably the source estimates<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; from<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; nearby vertices lack independence.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; (3)    Multidimensional regression: I presume that you are doing your<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; regression for a single time point, tau.  Or perhaps you are averaging<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; the<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; amplitude values centered on the peak.  In either case you get a single<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; number for each magnetic field sensor for each trial.  Instead you<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; could use<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; multiple points about the center of a peak and use a low order<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; polynomial of<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; tau multiplied by your original independent variable.  Note that<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; averaging<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; is equivalent to using a zero-order polynomial.   If you use say 21<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; data<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; points centered on the peak, you increase your degrees of freedom by<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; quite a<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; lot.  Of course your 21 data points lack independence but you still are<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; using more information to do the regression.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; (4)     The more important additional variable is along the time axis<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; for<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; the sequence of trials.  If you use a polynomial function for that, any<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; non-zero Beta other than the zero-order one represents a<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; nonstationarity in<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; your measurements.  This is rarely assessed but with humans doing a<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; task is<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; always a concern and it&#39;s interesting too.  The attached figure<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; illustrates<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; ideas (3) and (4) with evoked potential data.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; I hope I&#39;m understanding you correctly and that this is helpful.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Regards,<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Don<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Don Krieger, Ph.D.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Department of Neurological Surgery<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; University of Pittsburgh<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; (412)648-9654 Office<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; (412)521-4431 Cell/Text<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; From: <a href="mailto:mne_analysis-bounces@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu">mne_analysis-bounces@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu</a><br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; [mailto:<a href="mailto:mne_analysis-bounces@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu">mne_analysis-bounces@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu</a>] On Behalf Of Teon<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Brooks<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 12:34 AM<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; To: <a href="mailto:mne_analysis@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu">mne_analysis@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu</a><br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Subject: [Mne_analysis] Computing regression on sensor data then<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; transforming to source space<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Hi MNE listserv,<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; I have single-trial data that I would like to regress a predictor<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; (let&#39;s say<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; word frequency) on it and then compute a source estimate. I&#39;m planning<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; to<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; use mne-python to do this computation. I was wondering if I could do<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; the<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; regression over single trial sensor data first, get the beta values for<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; each<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; sensor over time, and then compute the source estimate as if it were an<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; evoked object.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; My presumption is that it should be fine if the source transformation<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; is<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; linear. The other option would be to source transform the data then do<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; the<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; regression but the problem with doing this first is that computing the<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; source estimates is more demanding on memory (say about 1000 trials<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; with the<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; around 5000 sources over 600-800ms of time). It would be more efficient<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; if<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; this computation could be done first if it is not computationally ill.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; What are your thoughts?<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Best,<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; --<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; teon<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; _______________________________________________<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; Mne_analysis mailing list<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; <a href="mailto:Mne_analysis@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu">Mne_analysis@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu</a><br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; <a href="https://mail.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/mne_analysis" target="_blank">https://mail.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/mne_analysis</a><br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; The information in this e-mail is intended only for the person to whom<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; it is<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; addressed. If you believe this e-mail was sent to you in error and the<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; e-mail<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; contains patient information, please contact the Partners Compliance<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; HelpLine at<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; <a href="http://www.partners.org/complianceline" target="_blank">http://www.partners.org/complianceline</a> . If the e-mail was sent to you<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; in<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; error<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; but does not contain patient information, please contact the sender and<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; properly<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt; dispose of the e-mail.<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; _______________________________________________<br>
&gt;&gt; Mne_analysis mailing list<br>
&gt;&gt; <a href="mailto:Mne_analysis@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu">Mne_analysis@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu</a><br>
&gt;&gt; <a href="https://mail.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/mne_analysis" target="_blank">https://mail.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/mne_analysis</a><br>
&gt; _______________________________________________<br>
&gt; Mne_analysis mailing list<br>
&gt; <a href="mailto:Mne_analysis@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu">Mne_analysis@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu</a><br>
&gt; <a href="https://mail.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/mne_analysis" target="_blank">https://mail.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/mne_analysis</a><br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
<br>
<br>
</div></div>--<br>
<div class="">Hari Bharadwaj<br>
PhD Candidate, Biomedical Engineering,<br>
</div>Boston University<br>
677 Beacon St.,<br>
<div class="">Boston, MA 02215<br>
<br>
Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging,<br>
Massachusetts General Hospital<br>
</div>149 Thirteenth Street,<br>
<div class="im HOEnZb">Charlestown, MA 02129<br>
<br>
<a href="mailto:hari@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu">hari@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu</a><br>
Ph: <a href="tel:734-883-5954" value="+17348835954">734-883-5954</a><br>
<br>
<br>
</div><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
Mne_analysis mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Mne_analysis@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu">Mne_analysis@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu</a><br>
<a href="https://mail.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/mne_analysis" target="_blank">https://mail.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/mne_analysis</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>